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Posts for: August, 2016

By Countryside Dental
August 23, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
ChrissyTeigensTeeth-GrindingTroubles

It might seem that supermodels have a fairly easy life — except for the fact that they are expected to look perfect whenever they’re in front of a camera. Sometimes that’s easy — but other times, it can be pretty difficult. Just ask Chrissy Teigen: Recently, she was in Bangkok, Thailand, filming a restaurant scene for the TV travel series The Getaway, when some temporary restorations (bonding) on her teeth ended up in her food.

As she recounted in an interview, “I was… like, ‘Oh my god, is my tooth going to fall out on camera?’ This is going to be horrible.” Yet despite the mishap, Teigen managed to finish the scene — and to keep looking flawless. What caused her dental dilemma? “I had chipped my front tooth so I had temporaries in,” she explained. “I’m a grinder. I grind like crazy at night time. I had temporary teeth in that I actually ground off on the flight to Thailand.”

Like stress, teeth grinding is a problem that can affect anyone, supermodel or not. In fact, the two conditions are often related. Sometimes, the habit of bruxism (teeth clenching and grinding) occurs during the day, when you’re trying to cope with a stressful situation. Other times, it can occur at night — even while you’re asleep, so you retain no memory of it in the morning. Either way, it’s a behavior that can seriously damage your teeth.

When teeth are constantly subjected to the extreme forces produced by clenching and grinding, their hard outer covering (enamel) can quickly start to wear away. In time, teeth can become chipped, worn down — even loose! Any dental work on those teeth, such as fillings, bonded areas and crowns, may also be damaged, start to crumble or fall out. Your teeth may become extremely sensitive to hot and cold because of the lack of sufficient enamel. Bruxism can also result in headaches and jaw pain, due in part to the stress placed on muscles of the jaw and face.

You may not be aware of your own teeth-grinding behavior — but if you notice these symptoms, you might have a grinding problem. Likewise, after your routine dental exam, we may alert you to the possibility that you’re a “bruxer.” So what can you do about teeth clenching and grinding?

We can suggest a number of treatments, ranging from lifestyle changes to dental appliances or procedures. Becoming aware of the behavior is a good first step; in some cases, that may be all that’s needed to start controlling the habit. Finding healthy ways to relieve stress — meditation, relaxation, a warm bath and a soothing environment — may also help. If nighttime grinding keeps occurring, an “occlusal guard” (nightguard) may be recommended. This comfortable device is worn in the mouth at night, to protect teeth from damage. If a minor bite problem exists, it can sometimes be remedied with a simple procedure; in more complex situations, orthodontic work might be recommended.

Teeth grinding at night can damage your smile — but you don’t have to take it lying down! If you have questions about bruxism, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Stress & Tooth Habits” and “When Children Grind Their Teeth.”


By Countryside Dental
August 11, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: bridges   dental crowns  

If you have missing or damaged teeth, dental crowns and bridges can work together to give you back your smile. However, understanding crowns and bridgesthese important dental restorations may seem overwhelming. Luckily, your Chatham, NY dentists Drs. Domenic Riccobono and Vicki E. Cohn can help answer your questions and gather the information you need to determine if crowns and bridges are right for you. Find out more with your dentist at Countryside Dental.

What is a crown? 
A crown is a cap-like dental restoration which fits over the top of a tooth. Crowns are often used after root canal therapy to stabilize and protect the large filling left behind. However, crowns have other uses, such as restoring the biting surface of a weakened or worn tooth, protecting a damaged tooth, replacing a missing tooth as part of a dental implant, or improving the appearance of a tooth.

What is a bridge? 
A bridge replaces a missing tooth. Bridges benefit those who have a gap between two natural, healthy teeth. A permanent bridge uses a dental crown on either side to anchor the bridge into place on top of the two surrounding teeth. Removable bridges use metal clasps to latch onto the surrounding teeth.

Crowns and Bridges in Chatham, NY
The process of creating a crown or bridge is similar. A technician at a dental lab uses a mold taken of your mouth as the basis for the design of your crown or bridge. The technician carves the porcelain restorations specifically for your mouth, ensuring the crown or bridge fits in flawlessly. Your dentist chooses one of many shades of porcelain for your crown or bridge so that it matches your teeth to achieve an even-colored smile.

How do I care for my crown or bridge?
Caring for your dental restorations is easy. Just like with your natural teeth, you should brush twice daily for at least two minutes. Break the mouth into quadrants and spend at least 30 seconds on each section. Floss at least once a day, using a separate strand of floss for each quadrant of the mouth to cut down on the spread of bacteria. Bridges require that you also floss underneath them using special threading dental floss. Your Chatham, NY dentist can help you learn the best way to care for your restorations.

For more information on crowns and bridges in the Chatham, NY area, please contact Dr. Domenic Riccobono, DDS and Dr. Vicki E. Cohn, DDS at Countryside Dental. Call (518) 392-5231 to schedule your consultation for crowns and bridges today!


By Countryside Dental
August 08, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
IfYoureConsideringBracesHeresHowTheyWork

If you or a family member has problems with teeth alignment or your bite, you may be considering braces. This tried and true method can straighten out most smiles — but there's more to braces than you may realize.

For one thing, orthodontic treatment wouldn't work if it weren't for the natural mechanism for tooth movement that already exists in the mouth. It may seem your teeth are rigidly set in the jawbone but that's not how they maintain their attachment: that's the job of an elastic connective tissue known as the periodontal ligament that lies between the tooth and the bone. The ligament has tiny fibers that attach to the tooth on one side and to the bone on the other to actually hold the teeth in place, much like a hammock secured between two posts.

The ligament attachment also allows the teeth to move incrementally in response to environmental factors or the aging process. We harness this natural movement ability with braces to move teeth to a more desirable position. We first attach small brackets to the front crowns of the teeth (the visible portion) and then string arch wires through them. We then attach the wires to anchor points where we can adjust the amount of tension they're exerting through the brackets against the teeth. By gradually increasing that tension, the teeth respond as they would when any force is applied against them and begin to move.

By precisely controlling that movement we can transform a patient's smile. But we believe the advantages are more than cosmetic: the teeth will function better and will be easier to care for and keep clean. These benefits, though, have to be balanced with heightened risks for root resorption (something that occurs only about 10% of the time) in which the ends of the roots can shrink, or loss of mineral content in teeth enamel where the hardware makes it more difficult to remove bacterial plaque. These risks can be reduced by closely monitoring dental health during the entire treatment process and through stepped up efforts in daily oral hygiene.

The starting point for deciding on an orthodontic treatment is a thorough dental examination with x-rays or CT scan imaging. Once we have a complete picture of your misalignment problems and any other extenuating circumstances, we can recommend a treatment plan just for you.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics.”